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Archive for the ‘Quilting’ Category

Animal Baby Quilt

Using the Triple Rails pattern from Even More Quilts for Baby, by Ursula Reikes, I used blue, green, and animal print fabrics to make a baby quilt.

 

You start with squares and strips of the various fabrics.

You make fabric strips that alternate the blue and green fabric (triple rails).

 

You cut the rowed fabric into rectangles or narrow strips.

You make checkerboard squares.

You make rows of fabric that alternate checkerboards and “triple rails.”

You alternate the theme printed fabric with the triple rails.

You sew all of your rows together and you get a great baby quilt top!

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More Baby Quilt Fabrics

 

I picked up some more baby quilt fabrics.  I’m quite excited about them!

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This is the “Hearts and Hands” baby quilt from More Quilts for Baby, by Ursula Reikes.

First, you cut strips of fabric.

You have to pick the order you’ll do the strips of fabric, and then you sew the strips together until you have all five strips sewn together.  You’ll have several sets of the connected five strips.

Once the strips are connected, you cut them into sections and join the sections in rows, rotating every other section, so that you have a section with stripes going vertically, then a section with horizontal stripes, etc.

Below is a photo of trimming the edges of a row of connected sections, so that the edges are straight.

Once you’ve completed all of your rows, sew the rows together.  This will give you the rail fence design.  In the photo below, you can see, going across a row, horizontal, then vertical, then horizontal (etc.) sections.

Sew border fabric to opposite sides (top/bottom and right/left).

Here is the completed baby quilt top!  It’s actually quite gigantic and more suited to a toddler bed.

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This is Part Two of making a nine patch baby quilt.

Up to this point, I talked about how to make 6 nine patch blocks.

When the blocks were done, I trimmed them to 10 x 10 inches.

I cut 2 inch wide strips of a lighter print for an inner border.  I used it around each block and around all six blocks.  1/2 yard of fabric was sufficient.

First, sew a strip of the inner border to the side of each block.

Then, connect the blocks in a row, adding a strip of border fabric to the end that doesn’t have border.

Next, sew a strip of border fabric across the bottom of each row of blocks.  Connect the rows and add a strip of border fabric to the side that doesn’t have border.  You should now have border around every block and around the entire quilt.

Now, it’s time for the outer border.  I cut a 5-1/2 inch outer border of a darker pink solid.  I put this around the entire quilt, sewing it to opposite sides at a time.   7/8 yard of fabric should be enough for the outer border.

This is the finished quilt top.  The outer border is pinker than it appears, it’s just the lighting!  This is a great way to use leftover fabrics, because each square of fabric is 4 x 4.  If you don’t have enough squares for the design above, then you can mix and match patterns and colors within each block.

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This is Part One of making a nine patch baby quilt.

I got the measurements for the inner and outer borders from More Quilts for Baby, by Ursula Reikes.

To make this quilt top, I first cut 4 inch squares from a variety of dark and light fabrics.  I ended up not using all of the squares I cut.

I then arranged dark and light colors in nine patches with darker colors in the middle.  I made six blocks.  I sewed together the pieces of each block using a 1/4 inch seam allowance.

I recommend sewing each row of a block, and then connecting each row.

Stay tuned for Part Two!

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Baby Quilt Fabrics

I picked up some baby quilt fabrics that I’m very excited about.

 

 

I had already made these pink blocks from scraps, so I picked up the pink and polka-dot fabric to use as outer and inner borders.

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Fabric Stash

You know it’s time to dig in to your fabric stash when it’s busting out of your storage cabinet!

All of the fabric in the smaller bins (mostly top shelf) are scraps or leftovers from sewing and quilting projects.  The fabric in the bottom consists of unused lengths of fabric, scraps, and quilt tops that need to be layered with batting and quilted.

I’ve started cutting squares to make some baby quilts.  I have so much denim, I’ll probably do a quilt from that as well.

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